The Revolutionary Anger of Asian Women

For Asian women in the diaspora, the denial of our anger exists at the toxic intersection of sexism and the model minority stereotype, enforced on two fronts by white Western culture and from within our own communities. The prohibition of our rage actively endangers us. But attempts to suppress our anger also reveal its power: it poses a threat. Our anger can be a tool of resistance in a post-pandemic world. Instead of burying or relinquishing it, we should learn to use it.

For Ro White’s series “How To Survive A Post(?)-COVID World”, I wrote about what Asian female angry resistance would look like in a post pandemic world.

This article is published in Autostraddle, a digital publication and real life community for multiple generations of LGBTQIA+ humans (and their friends). 

Mois du patrimoine asiatique

À l’occasion du Mois du patrimoine asiatique, j’ai eu l’occasion de discuter avec trois aînés asiatiques aux origines et aux parcours très différents. Ces trois personnes m’ont très chaleureusement raconté leur histoire, leur périple jusqu’au Canada et leur quotidien. 

Je me suis entretenue avec M. Wei, un retraité shanghaïen qui a un lien fusionnel avec sa fille ; avec Sivambikai « Ambika » Sivamoorthy, une intervenante communautaire tamoule à la vie remplie de rebondissements ; et avec Nourmohamed Ibragimov, le père de la première famille ouïghoure à s’être installée au Canada.  

Ces trois articles ont été publiés dans La Converse, un nouveau média d’actualités numériques qui un journalisme de dialogue pour servir les communautés marginalisées. Si vous avez d’autres histoires que vous voulez que je couvre, vous pouvez m’écrire. Et si vous voulez plus de nouvelles de ce genre, abonnez-vous à l’info-lettre de La Converse ici.

How Tam Found Empowerment in the Closet

Many queer people find incredible strength and power in the act of coming out fully as themselves. While being able to show up as our full queer selves in our lives is a very beautiful thing, it can also be a lot of pressure to craft the perfect official coming out. This is especially true for aromantic and/or asexual folks, who still lack a societial template to navigate their sexuality, and for queer Asians, for whom coming out has communal repercussions. So what are you to do when you are a Vietnamese asexual and aromantic woman who grew up in white, cishet, francophone-dominated Montreal in the 1980s and 1990s?

For Asian heritage month, I sat down with Tam (not her real name) to candidly chat about her journey navigating her asexuality and aromanticism. Over many laughs, we discussed her confusing process into finding her sexuality, her dating adventures and how she came to find empowerment in the closet.

This article is published in Autostraddle, a digital publication and real life community for multiple generations of LGBTQIA+ humans (and their friends). 

Quartier chinois : la communauté se mobilise contre l’embourgeoisement

La semaine passée, la partie la plus ancienne du Quartier chinois a été achetée par Investissements 1000 Saint-Urbain. Le quartier est de nouveau dans une impasse, coincé face aux spéculateurs. L’inquiétude grandit devant les acheteurs de propriétés, qui menacent de réduire à néant ce quartier, dont la superficie diminue année après année. Les membres de la communauté chinoise s’organisent pour tenter de contrer l’embourgeoisement de leur quartier.

Cet article a été publié dans La Converse, un nouveau média d’actualités numériques qui un journalisme de dialogue pour servir les communautés marginalisées. Si vous avez d’autres histoires que vous voulez que je couvre, vous pouvez m’écrire. Et si vous voulez plus de nouvelles de ce genre, abonnez-vous à l’info-lettre de La Converse ici.

Do Queer Asians Even Exist?

This 3-part series of articles explores the different facets of queer Asian invisibility in Montreal and the specifics of that particular intersectionality. Throughout the series I follow the lives of six queer Asians in Montreal – Linh, JP, Shawn, Fang, S. and A.L. – as they navigate life at the intersection of their identities and their environment. This first part will put the focus on the experiences of queer Asian individuals and their families. The second part will put the focus on their lived realities as they navigate daily life in their broader community. And the last part will put the focus on their thoughts, reflections, hopes and dreams within the society they exist in.

The first part of this series is published in the second volume of Sticky Rice Magazine – (BE)LONGING: The Queer Edition, which I had the pleasure to edit alongside three bright individuals – Philip Mak, Kevin Ah-Sen, Serene Mitchell.

This series is published in Sticky Rice Magazine, a Montreal-based Asian Canadian publication that aims to promote interculturalism by focusing on issues relevant to the Asian Canadian diaspora

Everyday Sustainability Asia

Sustainability is at the risk of commercialisation – the very thing it is supposed to be fighting against – facing greenwashing aimed at white consumers to the exclusion of minority groups. Yet around the world, every community has its own sustainability traditions, many of which can unlock sustainable habits for all homes. I talked to Asians worldwide to learn about their sustainable practices and investigate why they are not included in the West’s mainstream sustainability discourse.

This article is published in the third volume of Fen + Field Magazine – Where are we now, which examines the importance of home in our currently fraught world.

Fen + Field is an independently published magazine that aims to inspire and nurture creative, wild souls through written and visual storytelling. It focuses on the human/nature relationship to unearth stories that explore how to be a modern human in a wild world.

Agression mortelle au Dépanneur de Lille: une communauté soudée dans le deuil

Avertissement: meurtre, racisme, funérailles, mention de crime haineux


Le 15 november 2020, je me suis rendue aux funérailles de M. Yong, un propriétaire de dépanneur qui a été tué dans son commerce. J’ai discuté avec sa famille, ses amis, et plusieurs membres de la communauté pour honorer cet homme, faire entendre son histoire, et prêter voix à une communauté qui est trop souvent oubliée dans la sphère publique québécoise.

Cet article a été publié dans La Converse, un nouveau média d’actualités numériques qui un journalisme de dialogue pour servir les communautés marginalisées. Si vous avez d’autres histoires que vous voulez que je couvre, vous pouvez m’écrire. Et si vous voulez plus de nouvelles de ce genre, abonnez-vous à l’info-lettre de La Converse ici.

Plan A Presents: The Rebel Minority

My millionth sincere attempt to become “the worst minority ot all time”, The Rebel Minority is my monthly column. Published on the first Wednesday of every month, I perform countercultural analyses of various societal and lifestyle phenomena in a sometimes light, sometimes serious tone. The goal of this column is to break the veneer of respectability that has long surrounded the existence of Asians in the West and bring my own honest intersectional diasporic Asian perspective to various issues of our chaotic Burning 20s.

Got an idea you want me to write about? Send them to me here with the subject line “The Rebel Minority: Column Idea”. I look forward to hearing from you!

This column is published in Plan A Magazine, a political Asian American publication that focuses on exploring issues relevant to the Asian diaspora from around the world and on radical movement building for justice.

UBI: A New Form of Artistic Patronage?

Artistic labour has always been traditionally devalued and exploited, and now this reality is more stark than ever. On September 19, 2020, as part of the International Basic Income Week, I attended an informational gathering organized by Revenu de Base Québec at Espace Lafontaine to spread the word on UBI. The main purpose of the gathering was to disseminate information about the concept, which is still not widely understood in Montreal. I spoke to multiple activists, researchers and community organizers that were present to shed light on this policy and explore its potential to transform the artistic workplace.

This article was featured in Culture Pledge, a new media project that aims to reduce barriers of access into the arts & culture industries.

Culture Pledge: Sharing the Arts Crowdfunding Story

The art world has traditionally been elitist and inaccessible to many artists as well as many art enthusiasts from marginalized backgrounds. This inaccessiblity has recently sparked discussions in the mainstream about representation and diversity in the arts, and many are trying to figure out the best way forward. As a regular contributor to Culture Pledge, I write pieces on how crowdfunding can be a powerful tool used to accomplish these goals. I have written on topics as diverse as the effect of the 2020 Beirut explosion on the local arts community, online art platforms, and Black artists working with AI to dismantle systemic racism.

Read all my Culture Pledge work here.